A new addiction is sweeping the nation. A device, called the Juul, is a slim e-cigarette vaporizer that looks like a flash drive and can be charged in a laptop or other USB port. Users insert disposable “pods” of nicotine liquid into the vaporizer. The pods come in flavors that appeal to kids and teens, such as mango, fruit medley, and crème brulee.

Because the Juul is less recognizable than other e-cigarette devices, parents might not even realize their child is vaping. The Juul also puts out less smoke than other devices — and fades away quickly — so some older kids and teens are using them to vape in school. As a result, many schools and school districts are on high alert for the devices. The Juul delivers nicotine levels similar to a cigarette’s. Each pod has about the same amount of nicotine as a pack of cigarettes or 200 puffs. E-cigarettes don’t burn tobacco, so people don’t inhale the same amounts of tar and carbon monoxide as with a regular cigarette. Nicotine, though, is in most e-cigarettes. Nicotine acts on the brain, nervous system, and heart, and can raise blood pressure and heart rate. After the initial effects wear off, the body starts to crave nicotine because of its addictive quality.

E-cigarettes continue to become more popular. So, your kids may notice other kids vaping and want to try it as something new and cool. Advertisers are spending big bucks on marketing the devices. While they maintain that they’re “designed for smokers” or “adult smokers trying to quit,” the lifestyle marketing also appeals to middle and high school age kids. This has caused an epidemic in schools across the united states and must be stopped. If you see someone Juul, say something. It could save their life.